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Can You Spot the Leopard Before It Turns You Into Lunch?

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A photo of a perfectly camouflaged leopard went viral on social media, and people were completely blown away by what an amazing job the big cat’s coat did of hiding it.

Now, here comes the challenge.

The leopard appears to be hunkered down roughly 75 feet from the camera (This is your first and only hint).

Humans walk at a brisk four feet per second. Assuming you take your time to enjoy the scenery while you mosey through this wilderness, a leisurely pace could mean it takes you a full 30 seconds before you’re in striking distance of the leopard.

Can you spot it before your time is up?

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The tweet is below, but feel free to bring up the full-sized image.

You’ll likely need it.

Did you find the leopard?

If you didn’t spot it before the end of your 30 seconds, let’s hope you were exercising your Second Amendment rights.

While it’s not as easy to spot as a rhino or an elephant, the leopard can be just as deadly.

As an ambush predator, the big cat relies on speed and the element of surprise to catch its prey off guard before shredding them with razor-sharp claws and imposing teeth.

In order to pull off a successful ambush, the leopard relies on its coat and stealthy maneuvers to get in position without its prey knowing.

Leopards have been known to attack and kill humans, especially children and the infirm.

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With the reduction of habitat and public awareness campaigns, these numbers have been drastically reduced in the last two centuries.

Fortunately, there are very few leopards that run wild in the United States.

Still having a tough time finding the predator? Here’s a full-size picture with the leopard pointed out.

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Jared has written more than 200 articles and assigned hundreds more since he joined The Western Journal in February 2017. He was an infantryman in the Arkansas and Georgia National Guard and is a husband, dad and aspiring farmer.
Jared has written more than 200 articles and assigned hundreds more since he joined The Western Journal in February 2017. He is a husband, dad, and aspiring farmer. He was an infantryman in the Arkansas and Georgia National Guard. If he's not with his wife and son, then he's either shooting guns or working on his motorcycle.
Location
Arkansas
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Military, firearms, history




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