News

Joe Biden's Celebration Speech Interrupted by Stage-Storming Protesters

This is a timeline from The Associated Press of the latest on the Democratic presidential primary and Super Tuesday (all times local):

10:35 p.m.

Protesters interrupted former Vice President Joe Biden’s Super Tuesday celebratory remarks to supporters in Los Angeles.

Women holding signs reading “Let Dairy Die” stormed the podium where Biden was giving remarks Tuesday night, flanked by his wife and sister.

Biden moved to the side as security removed the women.

Trending:
Watch: Biden Gets Confused, Struggles to Speak for 28 Seconds Straight

Protesters from the animal rights group have interrupted recent campaign events in Nevada and California.

Topless women with “Let Dairy Die” written on their chests protested a Bernie Sanders campaign event earlier this month.

As soon as the women were removed, Biden resumed his remarks.

__

10:30 p.m.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has won Utah’s Democratic presidential primary.

The state has 29 delegates at stake.

Related:
BLM Activists Seize Control of George Floyd Square Again, Put Barriers Back Up

Sanders has a deep well of popularity with the state’s left-leaning voters.

The Democratic primary is open in Utah, so voters can cast a ballot regardless of party affiliation.

Some in the Republican majority have not fully embraced President Donald Trump, and moderates saw an opportunity to woo middle-of-the-road voters with a pitch that they offer the best chance to unseat the president.

Sanders has also won Vermont and Colorado.

Joe Biden has won Arkansas, Minnesota, Tennessee, Alabama, Oklahoma, North Carolina and Virginia.

__

10:20 p.m.

Bernie Sanders is expressing “absolute confidence” that he’ll be victorious in his pursuit of the Democratic presidential nomination, despite losing many of the early Super Tuesday races to Joe Biden.

Speaking to supporters in Essex Junction, Vermont, Sanders stuck to his standard criticisms of his Democratic rivals without naming them. He also promoted himself as putting together “an unprecedented, grassroots, multigenerational, multi-racial movement.”

Thus far, Sanders had won two contests of the night: his home state of Vermont and Colorado.

Referencing states yet to be counted, including delegate-rich Texas, Sanders said, “I don’t know what’s going to happen later on tonight,” noting he was “cautiously optimistic” he would win California.

He ended by thanking Vermonters for their support through the years, closing with, “Let’s go on to the White House.”

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



loading

We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , , , , ,
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




loading

Conversation