Commentary

Liberal Millennials So Fragile, Dems Have To Use Therapy Dogs Just To Get Them To Vote

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Democrats are singularly focused on reclaiming majority power in Congress in the midterm elections as part of their broader agenda to obstruct President Donald Trump and ultimately see him removed from office, either by way of impeachment or in the 2020 election.

In order to retake control of Congress, Democrats need a massive turnout of voters on their behalf in November — the much-heralded “blue wave” — and that means the party needs significant participation in the midterms by two key voting blocs for them, minorities and millennials, both of whom tend not to show up in great numbers at the polls in off-year elections.

In order to rectify that trend, a liberal political advocacy group known as NextGen America — created and funded by progressive billionaire Tom Steyer — has launched what is being billed as a “Pups to the Polls” gimmick on college campuses to try and register young voters ahead of the elections, according to Bloomberg.

Greeting returning students on the campus of the University of Wisconsin-Madison were NextGen America activists with therapy dogs in tow, dogs which the students were encouraged to pet and play with momentarily as a form of stress relief, similar to the absurd “safe spaces” young liberals are always demanding to be provided for them.

While the students stopped to pet the dogs, they were also encouraged to register to vote, and though the activists are supposed to act in a non-partisan manner during voter registration drives, it goes without saying that most of the students they succeeded in getting registered to vote will cast their vote for a Democrat … if they even show up at the polls in November.

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Steyer — who has also been funding an impeachment drive against Trump — has reportedly poured $30 million of his own fortune into the effort that is quite possibly the largest voter engagement effort of its kind in American history.

Steyer’s millions are largely focused on college and university campuses in states with critical congressional elections such as California, North Carolina, Virginia and Wisconsin, among other specific districts across the country.

Unfortunately for Steyer, his activists and even their voter registration therapy dogs, while polling suggests that young people are increasingly realizing the importance of midterm elections and voting for candidates who share their ideological outlook on certain issues, those young people are less excited about voting for career politicians and historically have a low participation rate in midterm elections.

Indeed, though it has been estimated that an additional 15 million new voters have become eligible to vote since the 2014 elections — voters the Democrats are clearly targeting for all they are worth — actual turnout among that bloc of new voters in November is still expected to be far less than other demographic groups of voters.

Is the use of therapy dogs in a voter registration drive one of the most absurd things you've ever heard?

For example, turnout among 18-24-year-old voters in 2014 was at an astonishingly low 17.1 percent — the lowest rate for that group in 40 years — and that bloc of young voters cast an incredible 21 million fewer votes than the bloc of voters aged 54 and above.

Nevertheless, Steyer and his group hope to counter and reverse that trend through their voter registration drive, and NextGen America is so confident in their push that they’ve dispatched more than 800 organizers to some 421 campuses nationwide.

“We’re trying really hard to have this be much more of an infrastructure, organizational thing than a two-month campaign,” Steyer said of the effort. “We’re trying to get the broadest possible democracy, the biggest representation.”

The Daily Wire noted in reporting on the voter registration therapy dog gimmick that it seemed like a natural progression for activists to use therapy dogs to attract college students who were already obsessed with “safe spaces,” which in many recent cases have been equipped with therapy dogs.

Yet, owing to the historically dismal actual turnout numbers of young voters in off-year elections, the effectiveness of this voter registration is entirely unclear at this moment, as registering every single eligible voter on a campus ultimately means nothing if they don’t get out and actually vote on Election Day.

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One can only wonder if this liberal political advocacy group intends to launch a second phase of their drive on Election Day and post their therapy dogs at or near polling places in key districts in a bid to lure “safe space”-seeking students to the polls with promises of puppies to pet.

This is what far too many young people in our nation have been reduced to by the liberal dogma they’ve been force-fed by academia and the media — that they must be coaxed out of their campus “safe spaces” with therapy dogs in order to rally their enthusiasm to become politically active and actually go vote.

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Ben Marquis is a writer who identifies as a constitutional conservative/libertarian. He has written about current events and politics for The Western Journal since 2014. His focus is on protecting the First and Second Amendments.
Ben Marquis has written on current events and politics for The Western Journal since 2014. He reads voraciously and writes about the news of the day from a conservative-libertarian perspective. He is an advocate for a more constitutional government and a staunch defender of the Second Amendment, which protects the rest of our natural rights. He lives in Little Rock, Arkansas, with the love of his life as well as four dogs and four cats.
Birthplace
Louisiana
Nationality
American
Education
The School of Life
Location
Little Rock, Arkansas
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics




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