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Parents Outraged After Teachers Conspire to Reject 'Objectivity'

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Few jobs are more important and crucial in today’s world than that of a teacher.

They are literally shaping the minds of the next generation, and that’s not any sort of hyperbole.

So when teachers flagrantly misuse their position of power, it’s a troubling sign for all involved.

As they should be, parents in the Boston suburb of Newton were not happy when the Federalist obtained some incriminating emails sent between a group of history teachers shortly after Donald Trump was elected in 2016. The emails can be found here.

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The principal had originally told teachers to show their students different perspectives on hot-button issues, such as gun control and immigration laws.

One of the teachers, David Bedar, accused Trump and his supporters of “nativism, xenophobia, homophobia, etc.”

“Personally, I’m finding it really difficult in the current climate to teach kids to appreciate other perspectives. … [T]he ‘other viewpoint’ might not really be an argument ‘about which reasonable people can disagree’ and might not lead to any kind of intellectual, policy debate; it might just be blatantly racist,” Bedar said.

Ed Urquiola, a parent of a student at Newton North High School, spoke about how the teachers’ biases were trickling down to other students with “Fox & Friends.” Urquiola’s son, who had recently attended a Trump rally, was subjected to anti-Semitic vitriol and ridicule from his fellow students.

Do you think these teachers should be fired?

“I think [the teachers] need to be re-educated and disciplined to some degree,” Urquiola said.

When pressed about whether the teachers should be fired, Urquiola leaned towards not employing them.

“I wouldn’t hire them for my business,” Urquiola said.

It’s readily apparent why this is such a disservice to students. An echochamber, whether it’s conservative or liberal, is no good to anyone. Open, difficult and uncomfortable discussion and debate are crucial to learning. It’s appalling and shameful that teachers would dare to strip that away from students.

Objectivity can be difficult, but there’s a reason that the school’s principal asked the teachers to at least try to observe some modicum of it.

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“I am concerned that the call for ‘objectivity’ may just inadvertently become the most effective destructive weapon against social justice,” another teacher, Isongesit Ibokette, wrote in the emails.

Because that’s what every parent wants children learning in school, right? A teacher’s idea of social justice instead of objective reality?

The Newton teachers’ attitude is such a breach of trust on so many levels. Parents are trusting teachers with their kids. Kids are trusting teachers that they are role models deserving respect. Teachers who are actually able to do their jobs in an objective and fair manner are trusting their peers to do the same. Frankly, it’s pathetic.

With teachers like these, it’s little surprise that more and more parents are resorting to homeschooling.

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Bryan Chai has written news and sports for The Western Journal for more than two years and has produced more than 1,300 stories. He specializes in the NBA and NFL as well as politics.
Bryan Chai has written news and sports for The Western Journal for more than two years and has produced more than 1,300 stories. He specializes in the NBA and NFL as well as politics. He graduated with a BA in Creative Writing from the University of Arizona. He is an avid fan of sports, video games, politics and debate.
Birthplace
Hawaii
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Class of 2010 University of Arizona. BEAR DOWN.
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Phoenix, Arizona
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English, Korean
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Sports, Entertainment, Science/Tech




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