Commentary

Trump Puts 'White Supremacy' Lie to Rest Once and for All in Video Media Hopes No One Ever Sees

It has become pretty commonplace for Democrats and the establishment media to call President Donald Trump a “racist” or “white supremacist.”

Just this week, for instance, multiple 2020 Democratic presidential candidates, including former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke and Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Bernie Sanders of Vermont, have called Trump a white supremacist, as Axios noted.

Here’s the thing: Trump isn’t a racist. In fact, he has spent years telling the American public as much.

The media just isn’t listening. Or, more likely, they’re ignoring his past words because they want to push their narrative that the president is a racist.

But we’ve got the receipts in the form of a video mash-up of some of the times Trump has denounced racism over the years.

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The roughly four-minute video from conservative pundit Mark Dice was originally published in 2017. But it’s relevant now more than ever, as Trump is once again being barraged with accusations of racism.

When asked during the 2016 campaign about an endorsement from white supremacist and former Ku Klux Klan Grand Wizard David Duke, Trump responded: “I didn’t even know he endorsed me. … I disavow.”

“I totally disavow the Ku Klux Klan,” Trump added during one of the GOP presidential debates. “I totally disavow David Duke. I’ve been doing it now for two weeks.”

The video included plenty more examples from around that time. But Trump didn’t just start condemning Duke and the KKK after deciding to run for president.

Do you believe the media is trying to mislead the public about President Trump?

In 2000, Trump was asked by NBC’s Matt Lauer what he thought was “the biggest problem with the Reform Party right now.”

“Well, you’ve got David Duke just joined,” Trump replied. “A bigot, a racist, a problem. I mean, this is not exactly the people you want in your party.”

After violence erupted in Charlottesville, Virginia, following a clash between white nationalists and counter-protesters in 2017, Trump similarly condemned white supremacy.

“We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides,” he said. “It’s been going on for a long time in our country.”

Watch below:

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https://youtu.be/hoXThCb8EZA

Since the video is from 2017, it doesn’t include Trump’s most recent remarks against white supremacy. But he’s continued to condemn that hateful ideology up to the present day.

“In one voice, our nation must condemn racism, bigotry and white supremacy,” the president said in a speech Monday following the mass shootings in Texas and Ohio.

“These sinister ideologies must be defeated. Hate has no place in America. Hatred warps the mind, ravages the heart and devours the soul,” Trump added, according to a White House transcript of his remarks.

Here’s the main takeaway: Trump’s not a racist. He has condemned bigotry countless times over the years, and there’s plenty of video evidence to prove it.

The establishment media just doesn’t want you to see it.

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Joe Setyon is a deputy managing editor for The Western Journal who has spent his entire professional career in editing and reporting. He previously worked in Washington, D.C., as an assistant editor/reporter for Reason magazine.
Joe Setyon is deputy managing editor for The Western Journal with several years of copy editing and reporting experience. He graduated with a degree in communication studies from Grove City College, where he served as managing editor of the student-run newspaper. Joe previously worked as an assistant editor/reporter for Reason magazine, a libertarian publication in Washington, D.C., where he covered politics and wrote about government waste and abuse.
Birthplace
Brooklyn, New York
Topics of Expertise
Sports, Politics




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