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Virginia Governor Enrages Leftists by Setting Up Tool for Parents to Fight CRT in Public Schools

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Virginia Gov. Glenn Youngkin is taking the fight against critical race theory from Virginia’s public schools to the Old Dominion’s parents.

The governor, whose upset victory over Democratic career cog Terry McAuliffe in November largely came down to the strength of his willingness to combat the woke, has already made himself a prominent target for the nation’s left.

And his announcement Monday about a tip line for parents who spot CRT in their children’s classrooms just made the battle hotter.

Youngkin’s statement came while he was being interviewed by Virginia radio host John Fredericks.

The danger of the education philosophy that comes under the rubric of “critical race theory” in the U.S. is that it views all American history and modern society through the lens of race, teaching that black and Hispanic students are “oppressed” while white students are, by nature, “oppressors.”

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Youngkin acknowledged Monday, as he has before, that there is no “critical race theory course” in Virginia classrooms. But that doesn’t mean the danger isn’t there.

“These are the tenets that have made their way into the classroom,” he told Fredericks.

He offered an example of a game called “Privilege Bingo” that came to light recently in a Fairfax County high school. It sounds like a farce straight from the Babylon Bee, but was actually reported by WRC-TV in Washington, among other outlets.

Under the rules of the game, according to WRC, characteristics that counted as “privileged” were students being white, Christian, male, able-bodied or from a military family.

At least one Fairfax County elected official — County Supervisor Pat Herrity — wasn’t happy about it. (He’s a Republican, in case you had to ask.)

So, liberals can scoff at the idea that “critical race theory” is taught in public schools, and play word games to try to prove their point, but anyone involved in public schools has ample opportunity to know better.

In his first executive order upon taking office, Youngkin vowed to “restore excellence in education by ending the use of divisive concepts, including Critical Race Theory, in public education.”

“What this executive order clearly, clearly states is practices like teaching that one group is inherently privileged and that another is a victim, or that in fact, people today should be held responsible for sins of the past,” he told Fredericks. “These are the kinds of teaching practices that exist in our schools, and we are going to get them out.”

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Check out the interview below:



And now, Virginia parents have a direct line to help him keep that vow.

The state has set up an email address, helpeducation@governor.virginia.gov, where parents can alert state officials if they suspect their school is using what should be education as indoctrination instead.

The tip line, Youngkin said, is for “any instances where they feel that their fundamental rights are being violated, where their children are not being respected, where there are inherently divisive practices in their schools.”

“And we’re asking for input right from parents to make sure that we can go right to the source as we continue to work to make sure that Virginia’s education system is on the path to re-establish excellence.”

Now, any American even halfway familiar with leftist tactics when it comes to social media could predict what followed.

There was the expected torrent of outraged Twitter posts from liberals and the usual intellectually dishonest vomit (“Hitler’s Germany,” “Gestapo” etc. — standard tripe from fans of the political party that wants to control what Americans wear on their faces and shoot into their arms).

Then came vows to use cyber-guerilla tactics to sabotage it.

The editors of Newsweek cemented the publication’s place in the totalitarian establishment media by helpfully publicizing the effort to destroy Youngkin’s line.

“TikToker Calls on Gen Z to Flood Glenn Youngkin’s Tip Line for Reporting Teachers,” the Newsweek headline stated, with an article about an activist from Texas, all of 19 years old, who is apparently an expert on the subject of public education in Virginia.

Are leftists lying about critical race theory in schools?

The article noted, with obvious approval, that the same activist — again, a 19-year-old, for God’s sake — had “led a campaign urging people to inundate an anti-abortion group’s whistleblower website with fake tips.”

(Maybe Newsweek is where Teen Vogue editors go when they grow up. The same people who claim there’s no “critical race theory” in public schools are likely to argue there’s no bias in the mainstream media.)

It gets clearer by the day that Youngkin’s upset victory over McAuliffe in November was only the beginning of his real fight — with local, entrenched power structures in places like Fairfax County, with his state’s education establishment and with the innate malice of the major media outlets.

And it’s getting hotter all the time.

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Joe has spent more than 30 years as a reporter, copy editor and metro desk editor in newsrooms in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Florida. He's been with Liftable Media since 2015.
Joe has spent more than 30 years as a reporter, copy editor and metro editor in newsrooms in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Florida. He's been with Liftable Media since 2015. Largely a product of Catholic schools, who discovered Ayn Rand in college, Joe is a lifelong newspaperman who learned enough about the trade to be skeptical of every word ever written. He was also lucky enough to have a job that didn't need a printing press to do it.
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