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Aboriginal Leader Has Sobering Message for African Migrants

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Here’s a conflict of interests that could send liberals around the bend.

A leader of an aboriginal tribe — the kind liberals love to champion — has just come out with a warning for African immigrants, another group liberals love to champion.

And the warning is exactly the kind of sentiment conservatives love to hear.

In an interview with News Corp. in Australia, Witiyana Marika, a musician and leader of an Australian aboriginal tribe, wanted to make some things clear to the African migrants taking up residence in his homeland.

“You are welcome in this country,” Marika said. “I know you come from a place where bad things happen. But don’t make this country bad like your country.”

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According to News Corp., Marika’s comments were spurred by televised images of young African migrants running wild in the streets of Melbourne and other Australian communities.

To many readers, the violence might sound reminiscent of the turmoil that’s plagued Europe since migration from the Middle East became a major issue. It even sounds like the now-legendary outbreak of sexual violence that struck the ancient German city of Cologne on New Year’s Eve as 2015 turned into 2016.

But there’s a big difference in at least one reaction.

While the migrant violence striking Europe has outraged conservatives on the continent and in the United States, the violence now plaguing Australia is drawing rebukes from leaders like Marika, a whose racial and personal background should make him a champion to leftists the world over.

At 56, he’s not only an important cultural leader of his tribe, he’s also the founder of the music group Yothu Yindi, which includes white and aboriginal musicians.

In short, he sounds like a liberal’s multicultural dream.

But Marika sounds positively conservative when it comes to the violence hitting his homeland.

“They need guidance,” he said. “They’d be welcome here, to come here and understand our culture. We will show them how to respect people, both our world and the balanda (white) world. By showing them our world, we can reflect them into their world.”

And that, in short, is all conservatives — and decent people anywhere — are asking of the immigrant populations.

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Respect the laws of the new country and respect its cultural norms.

For liberals in the United States, anyway, that seems to be too much to ask of newcomers, starting with the request that they respect the laws of the United States by not immigrating here illegally.

Then, of course, there’s learning to speak English, finding employment and generally assimilating into society without trying to change it to the violent, Third World backwaters many immigrants escape from.

And that brings up again Marika’s most important words of the interview:

“I know you come from a place where bad things happen. But don’t make this country bad like your country.”

That’s what conservatives want. It’s what an aboriginal tribal leader in Australia wants.

To be honest, it doesn’t seem like much to ask. But considering the source here, it’s enough to drive liberals around the bend.

H/T Perth Now

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Joe has spent more than 30 years as a reporter, copy editor and metro desk editor in newsrooms in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Florida. He's been with Liftable Media since 2015.
Joe has spent more than 30 years as a reporter, copy editor and metro editor in newsrooms in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Florida. He's been with Liftable Media since 2015. Largely a product of Catholic schools, who discovered Ayn Rand in college, Joe is a lifelong newspaperman who learned enough about the trade to be skeptical of every word ever written. He was also lucky enough to have a job that didn't need a printing press to do it.
Birthplace
Philadelphia
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