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Alien vs. Pentagon? Perplexed DoD Setting Up Crack Team to Study, Monitor UFO 'Threats'

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The Department of Defense is setting up an office to monitor UFOs.

The Airborne Object Identification and Management Synchronization Group has been created and will succeed the Navy’s Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Task Force, according to a statement Tuesday on the Defense Department website.

The DoD said the new unit “will synchronize efforts across the Department and the broader U.S. government to detect, identify and attribute objects of interests in Special Use Airspace (SUA), and to assess and mitigate any associated threats to safety of flight and national security.”

“Incursions by any airborne object into our SUA pose safety of flight and operations security concerns, and may pose national security challenges. DOD takes reports of incursions — by any airborne object, identified or unidentified — very seriously, and investigates each one,” it said.

The DoD noted that a June report “identified the need to make improvements in processes, policies, technologies, and training to improve our ability to understand UAP.” UAP is the defense acronym for unexplained aerial phenomena.

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The action comes not long after Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines said, “There’s always the question of ‘is there something else that we simply do not understand, that might come extraterrestrially?’” according to The Hill.

Nick Pope, a former UFO investigator for Britain’s Ministry of Defense, said the action is a step forward.

“It further destigmatizes the issue by acknowledging the national security implications,” Pope told the Daily Mail.

He said the Defense Department might not have wanted a big splash, either.

“Putting this out just before Thanksgiving is also an indicator that the Pentagon is frustrated with the issue and doesn’t want a wider public conversation on any of this,” Pope said.

In June, the Pentagon issued a report that said out of 144 UAP reports since 2004, “We were able to identify one reported UAP with high confidence. In that case, we identified the object as a large, deflating balloon. The others remain unexplained,” the June report said.

The report said that most reported sightings “probably do represent physical objects given that a majority of UAP were registered across multiple sensors, to include radar, infrared, electro-optical, weapon seekers, and visual observation.”



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The report, which said sightings appear clustered near military installations, did not discuss extraterrestrial options.

It said that in 21 reports involving 18 episodes, the UAP possibly demonstrated technological abilities such as flying without observable propulsion or with rapid acceleration that the report said is beyond the capacity of the U.S. or other nations.

Do you think some UAPs are signs of alien life?

“In a limited number of incidents, UAP reportedly appeared to exhibit unusual flight characteristics. These observations could be the result of sensor errors, spoofing, or observer misperception and require additional rigorous analysis,” it said.

Our analysis of the data supports the construct that if and when individual UAP incidents are resolved they will fall into one of five potential explanatory categories: airborne clutter, natural atmospheric phenomena, USG or U.S. industry developmental programs, foreign adversary systems, and a catchall ‘other’ bin,” the report said.

Funding for the new unit was included in the proposed 2022 National Defense Authorization Act.

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Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack Davis is a freelance writer who joined The Western Journal in July 2015 and chronicled the campaign that saw President Donald Trump elected. Since then, he has written extensively for The Western Journal on the Trump administration as well as foreign policy and military issues.
Jack can be reached at jackwritings1@gmail.com.
Location
New York City
Languages Spoken
English
Topics of Expertise
Politics, Foreign Policy, Military & Defense Issues




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