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3-Year-Old Girl Pulled from Rubble 4 Days After Powerful Earthquake

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Rescuers in the Turkish city of Izmir pulled a young girl out alive from the rubble of a collapsed apartment building on Tuesday, four days after a strong earthquake hit Turkey and Greece and as hopes of reaching survivors began to fade.

Wrapped in a thermal blanket, the girl was taken into an ambulance on a stretcher to the sounds of applause and chants of “God is great!” from rescue workers and onlookers.

Health Minister Fahrettin Koca identified her as 3-year-old Ayda Gezgin on Twitter.

The child had been trapped inside the rubble for 91 hours since Friday’s quake struck in the Aegean Sea and was the 107th person to have been pulled out of collapsed buildings alive.

After she was pulled from the rubble, little Ayda called out for her mother in video of the rescue broadcast on television.

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But Ayda’s mother did not survive. Her body was found amid the wreckage hours later. Ayda’s brother and father were not inside the building at the time of the quake.

Rescuer Nusret Aksoy told reporters that he was sifting through the rubble of the toppled eight-floor building when he heard a child’s scream and called for silence. He later located the girl in a tight space next to a dishwasher.

The girl waved at him, told him her name and said that she was okay, Aksoy said.

“I got goosebumps and my colleague Ahmet cried,” he said.

Ibrahim Topal of the Humanitarian Relief Foundation said: “My colleague and I looked at each other like ‘Did you hear that, too?’ We listened again. There was a very weak voice saying something like ‘I’m here.’ Then we shut everything down, the machines, and started listening again. And there really was a voice.”

Health ministry officials said the girl was in good condition but would be kept under observation in the hospital for a while.

Her rescue came a day after another 3-year-old girl and a 14-year-old girl were also pulled out alive from collapsed buildings in Izmir, Turkey’s third-largest city.

Meanwhile, the death toll in the earthquake climbed to 111 after emergency crews retrieved more bodies from toppled buildings.

Officials said 138 quake survivors were still hospitalized, and three of them were in serious condition.

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The U.S. Geological Survey registered the quake’s magnitude at 7.0, though other agencies recorded it as less severe.

The vast majority of the deaths and some 1,000 injuries occurred in Izmir.

Two teenagers also died and 19 people were injured on the Greek island of Samos, near the quake’s epicenter in the Aegean Sea.

The quake also triggered a small tsunami that hit Samos and the Seferihisar district of Izmir province, where one elderly woman drowned.

The tremors were felt across western Turkey, including in Istanbul, as well as in the Greek capital of Athens. Hundreds of aftershocks followed.

In Izmir, the quake reduced buildings to rubble and authorities detained nine people, including contractors, for questioning over the collapse of six of the buildings.

Turkey sits on top of two major fault lines and earthquakes are frequent.


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