Chiefs fans vent on Twitter at English woman named Dee Ford

Combined Shape

KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — A 47-year-old Englishwoman has seen the best and worst that Twitter would have to offer the American football player who shares her name.

Dee Ford, of Kent, England, told the Kansas City Star that her “phone was going off literally nonstop” due to angry tweets from Kansas City Chiefs fans who thought they were venting at linebacker Dee Ford following his critical late penalty in last weekend’s AFC Championship loss to the New England Patriots. She says Ford “doesn’t deserve” the vitriol.

The player isn’t on Twitter, but he was no stranger to the Englishwoman. Five years ago when the player was still at Auburn, someone in the school’s athletic department inadvertently tagged the woman in a congratulatory tweet after the player was named most valuable player of the senior bowl. Fans responded with their own positive tweets.

She decided to learn about the game and was hooked. She has spoken to the Chiefs’ Dee Ford by phone and attended two games — an Auburn home game last fall and a Chiefs game in London in 2015.

___

Trending:
State Troopers Demand Apology After Governor Implies 'Police Are Racist Murderers'

Information from: The Kansas City Star, http://www.kcstar.com

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →






We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
Combined Shape
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation