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Kentucky's Benny Snell Jr. leaving early for NFL draft

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky running back Benny Snell Jr. says he’ll skip his senior season to enter the NFL draft, but will play in the Wildcats’ New Year’s Day bowl game.

Snell announced his decision in a video posted to Twitter on Friday. He thanks the school’s fans for making Kentucky feel like home, but said “there comes a time you have to leave home to build a life of your own. That’s what I’m about to do.”

Snell had three straight 1,000-yard rushing seasons at Kentucky. This season, he rushed for 1,305 yards and 14 touchdowns. He is 107 yards away from become the school’s career rushing leader.

He said he’ll play for the 16th-ranked Wildcats when they face No. 13 Penn State in the Citrus Bowl.

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