Premier: Telling companies to spy is 'not how China behaves'

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BEIJING (AP) — China’s No. 2 leader on Friday denied Beijing tells its companies to spy abroad, refuting U.S. warnings that Chinese technology suppliers might be a security risk.

Premier Li Keqiang’s comment at a news conference was the communist government’s highest-level rejection of accusations Chinese companies might spy on foreign customers.

Asked whether Beijing told Chinese companies to spy, Li said, “Let me tell you explicitly that this is not consistent with Chinese law. This is not how China behaves. We did not do that and will not do that in the future.”

The United States and some other governments have imposed curbs on use of technology from Chinese vendors including Huawei Technologies Ltd. as possible security risks.

Huawei, the biggest global maker of network gear for phone and internet companies, has denied accusations it facilitates Chinese spying.

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Huawei’s founder told reporters this year he would reject government requests to disclose confidential information about foreign customers.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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