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Biden's Pick to Sing National Anthem at Inauguration Once Wore Dress Made of Meat

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It’s no secret that popular culture in America has long been moving towards the left. That was once again evident today at the inauguration of President Joe Biden.

Biden chose Lady Gaga, the infamous pop singer known for once wearing a meat dress, to sing the national anthem.

If you aren’t familiar with Lady Gaga, here’s a quick video to give you an idea of the person we’re talking about. (Fair warning, the video contains graphic language and images that some viewers will find offensive.)

Nothing says classy like a grown woman running around the stage with blood all over herself.

Sadly, it’s not just her performances that are disturbing. Gaga has a long history of unsettling behavior both on and off the stage.

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According to Truthquake, Gaga was accused of performing a “Satanic ritual” in a London hotel in 2012 after leaving a bathtub filled with blood.

Before that, there was the aforementioned meat dress incident in 2010. After PETA and others were outraged by her decision to wear clothing made of raw animal flesh, Gaga defended herself to Ellen Degeneres.

“I, as you know, am the most judgment-free human being on the Earth,” Gaga told Degeneres.

“It has many interpretations, but for me this evening it’s [saying], ‘If we don’t stand up for what we believe in, if we don’t fight for our rights, pretty soon we’re going to have as much rights as the meat on our bones.'”

Was Lady Gaga the right choice to sing the National Anthem?

Her grammar was not the only thing wrong with that statement.

In America, we are guaranteed the precious rights of “Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness,” as the Declaration of Independence states.

It is in fact these rights, along with others specifically laid out in the Bill of Rights, that allow Gaga to wear a dress made of meat if she wishes.

However, in reading Lady Gaga’s comments about our country, it appears she has a different view than the Founding Fathers. Instead of a beautiful country meant to protect the rights given to us by our Creator, Gaga says America is racist at its very core.

Gaga made these views clear in a since-removed story from Billboard magazine.

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“When you’re born in this country, we all drink the poison that is white supremacy,” Gaga said, according to Fox News. “I am in the process of learning and unlearning things I’ve been taught my whole life.”

In Gaga’s view, every person born in America is born into a culture of white supremacy. That is quite an alarming assertion, and one that I would certainly argue is patently false.

Statements like this make it hard to stomach Lady Gaga as the performer of the national anthem at any event, let alone the inauguration. If America is racist by design, why would Gaga want to honor it by singing a song about its greatness?

Four years ago, then-President-elect Donald Trump chose a different path at his inauguration. He asked 16-year-old Jackie Evancho, a former “America’s Got Talent” standout at the age of 10, to sing the national anthem, according to ABC News.

Evancho had previously performed for the likes of Pope Francis and former President Barack Obama.

We can’t be sure what Joe Biden‘s presidency will look like. After his term has passed, then we can look back and accurately judge what we saw.

What we do see already, though, is a stark contrast from just four years ago.

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Grant is a graduate of Virginia Tech with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. He has five years of writing experience with various outlets and enjoys covering politics and sports.
Grant is a graduate of Virginia Tech with a bachelor's degree in journalism. He has five years of writing experience with various outlets and enjoys covering politics and sports.




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