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Op-Ed

Dick Morris: Criminal Chinese Company Had Strong Links to Clintons

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When the chief financial officer of Huawei Technologies, Meng Wanzhou, was arrested in Canada on Dec. 1 through an extradition warrant from the U.S., American media described, in detail, how the company had conspired to evade U.S. sanctions on Iran.

Huawei has long been involved in helping terrorist states and seeking to thwart U.S. sanctions. Meng is the daughter of Huawei’s founder, Ren Zhengfei.

As details of Huawei’s complicity with Iran emerge, it is time to look back on the Clinton family and its close relationship with Huawei.

When their connection was first exposed more than a decade ago, it just seemed like another shady Clinton deal.

But now, it becomes clear that Huawei has been central to the Iranian efforts to evade first U.N. and then U.S. sanctions.

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The Clintons were, indeed, conspiring with the enemy.

Huawei has long been a bad actor seeking to undermine U.S. foreign policy. But what is new is that the Trump administration won’t stand for it.

By contrast, the company has had a deep and long-term relationship with the Clinton family.

Their ties began when Terry McAuliffe, the Clintons’ top fundraiser and future governor of Virginia, bought a Chinese car company — Green Tech Automotive — and moved it to the U.S. in the hopes that it would produce electric cars.

Do you think the relationship of this company to the Clintons should be investigated?

McAuliffe got Huawei to invest in Green Tech through a financing firm called Gulf Coast Funds Management, headed by Hillary’s brother Tony Rodham.

Gulf Coast, boasting the Rodham name, agreed to help Huawei get visas for its top executives under the EB-5 program that awards visas to those who invest at least $500,000 in the U.S. to create jobs.

The feds had already turned Huawei down because of its links to the Chinese military.

Huawei’s misdeeds are plentiful.

  • It helped Saddam Hussein install fiber optic cable in violation of U.S. sanctions.
  • It helped the Taliban by installing a phone system in Kabul, Afghanistan.
  • It stole proprietary material from U.S. high tech company Cisco Systems. This material ended up in Chinese hands.
  • In 2013, Huawei tried to sell telecom equipment made by Hewlett Packard to Iran, in defiance of sanctions and, until a few weeks ago, the parent company of Huawei’s Iranian business partner was partly owned by the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps, which is playing the key role in Iran’s nuclear program.
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According to South China News, the U.S. action against Huawei “will severely damage, even cripple, the Chinese company. Of Huawei’s 92 core suppliers, 33 are U.S. corporations, including chip makers Intel, Qualcomm, Broadcom, Marvell and Micron. If Washington now prohibits these companies from selling to Huawei, the Chinese telecoms giant will struggle to survive.”

And, if the full role of the Clintons in their liaison with Huawei comes out, so will Bill and Hillary.

The views expressed in this opinion article are those of their author and are not necessarily either shared or endorsed by the owners of this website. If you are interested in contributing an Op-Ed to The Western Journal, you can learn about our submission guidelines and process here.

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Dick Morris is a former adviser to President Bill Clinton as well as a political author, pollster and consultant. His most recent book, "50 Shades of Politics," was written with his wife, Eileen McGann.




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