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Environmental Activism Now Beginning To Look Like Domestic Terrorism

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Environmental activists are growing more and more adamant with their demands and radical with their tactics.

In the pursuit of their desired goals, it seems that protesting is no longer enough, and some have moved on to more drastic measures, such as obstructing national transportation systems.

One such instance happened on Wednesday in Canada.

According the Toronto Sun, a group known as the Mohawk Warriors attempted to impede the route of a freight train by throwing rocks and lighting wooden skids on fire and placing them on the tracks.

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The protest was part of a nationwide blockade in opposition to the construction of a natural gas pipeline that would go through the territory of the Wet’suwet’en Nation in British Columbia.

Gas pipelines have prompted similar responses from environmental groups in the United States.

The Washington Post reported that the blockades have been ongoing and have greatly interfered with the railway system of Canada.

Not only were these unorthodox tactics ill-advised, they were incredibly dangerous. The protesters went so far as to stand on the tracks as the train approached, seemingly oblivious to the fact that trains cannot stop on a dime.

As usual with environmental protests, the damage has far-reaching implications. In addition to the interference with the train itself, local resources had to be used to fight the fires started by the group.

According to Global News, police and firefighters worked to put out the fires, only to have the protesters start more later in the day.

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This protest is disturbing enough as an isolated incident, but it seems to be part of a growing trend. Across the world, environmental protests are happening with greater frequency and vehemence. Environmentalists are looking less like activists and more like belligerent mobs.

We are seeing an increased cultural effort to push environmentalist narratives, and those who push them do so with a particular fervor.

Many have noted that environmentalism has become its own religion.

Its supporters certainly seem to pursue their goals with religious zeal.

However, people who understand the American political left can see environmentalism for what it really is: an ideological stick used to beat people into submission to communism.

But at what point will this extremist activism cross the line into domestic terrorism? Interfering with train travel certainly seems to be taking it up a notch beyond the typical disruption and inconvenience.

Hand-in-hand with the crazy protest tactics has been more extreme rhetoric on climate. Even former Vice President Joe Biden, the presumed moderate in the Democratic presidential field, has made dramatic statements about what he would be willing to sacrifice for the sake of a “greener economy.”

It is possible to be a peaceful environmentalist and take actions that provide actual, tangible benefits for communities.

A great example is Scott Presler, a conservative environmentalist who has had an impact with the simple act of organizing groups to pick up trash and spreading a message of positivity.



However, the overwhelming trend among environmentalists seems to be an agenda of creating chaos to achieve their ends and, in this case, literally derailing commerce.

There is no boundary they will not cross — even if it puts them in the path of a freight train.

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Natalie received her law degree and MA in Political Science from the University of Arkansas. She began writing for The Western Journal in 2020.
Natalie received her law degree and MA in Political Science from the University of Arkansas. She began writing for The Western Journal in 2020.




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