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School Doles Out Old Fashioned Justice to Students Who Walked Out

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All across America, students walked out of class en masse this week to protest a constitutional right they could barely understand.

And, since that constitutional right was the Second Amendment, they were breathlessly praised for it by the mainstream media.

In fact, some schools encouraged the walkouts. The media certainly didn’t do anything to discourage them, showing footage of the walkouts at every possible opportunity. Apparently, skipping school for a reason is totally OK if that reason is liberal.

However, one Arkansas school district took things somewhat differently — and it definitely smacked more of fashioned justice than newfangled liberalism.

According to KARK, one parent has made allegations that three students from Greenbrier Public School were paddled when they decided to participate in the walkouts.

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“We spoke with the school superintendent in Greenbrier who confirmed that three students participated in the walkout. He says no student came to school asking to participate in the walkout and had made no preparations,” KARK reported.

“He adds that they were not reprimanded for protesting but for breaking school handbook rules in regards to leaving class.

“We’re told the students were given the choice of suspension (usually 2 days) or corporal punishment for their participation in the walkout. Corporal punishment is a paddling and must be approved by a parent.

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“The superintendent said he could not reveal which option the students chose.”

The Daily Beast notes that Greenbrier Public School has allowed corporal punishment as an option since 2005.

Wylie Grier, one of the students who walked out, was all too quick to give himself a pat on the back for being so brave as to disobey school rules.

“Walking out of class at ten on Monday morning was not an easy thing. Many students were vocally insulting and degrading to the idea of the walk-out and anyone who would participate,” Grier said.

“At 10:00, I walked out of my classroom to a few gaped mouths and more than a few scowls. I exited the building, sat on the bench, and was alone for a few seconds. I was more than a little concerned that I would be the only one to walk out. I was joined by two others eventually, two of the smartest students at the school. We sat outside the front of the building and were approached first by the principal, who asked us ‘if he could help us’ and ‘if we understood that there would be consequences.’ After we answered affirmatively, he went back inside. A few minutes passed and the dean-of-students approached us. He asked “what we were doing,” we told him that we were protesting gun violence. He told us to go inside. We refused.”

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So, they ended up getting corporal punishment. Grier noted that “(t)he punishment was not dealt with malice or cruelty, in fact, I have the utmost respect for all the adults involved.”

While corporal punishment has fallen out of favor in recent years, 19 states still allow it to be used in public schools.

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C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal since 2014.
C. Douglas Golden is a writer who splits his time between the United States and Southeast Asia. Specializing in political commentary and world affairs, he's written for Conservative Tribune and The Western Journal since 2014. Aside from politics, he enjoys spending time with his wife, literature (especially British comic novels and modern Japanese lit), indie rock, coffee, Formula One and football (of both American and world varieties).
Birthplace
Morristown, New Jersey
Education
Catholic University of America
Languages Spoken
English, Spanish
Topics of Expertise
American Politics, World Politics, Culture




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