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Woman Who Gets Three Tattoos a Week Desperately Applies for a Job Cleaning Toilets - Then Gets Crushing News

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For some, tattoos are seen as a symbol of rebellion, a way to take a swipe at societal norms and allow one to feel like a unique individual.

However, one mother in the United Kingdom may have gone a bit too far with her obsession with tattoos, and she is now beginning to pay the social penalty for her choices.

According to the Daily Star, 46-year-old Melissa Sloan of Wales, a mother of two, has a wild “addiction” to tattoos and is constantly etching new designs onto her face.

She gets at least three new tattoos each week and says that most of them are done “prison style” by her partner, Luke, at home. Slowly but surely, however, she is beginning to realize that what she is doing with tattoos is having an adverse effect on her social standing.

She has found herself ostracized from many sectors of public life, including the workplace, where she is desperately seeking a job as a toilet cleaner — a job she held previously. But she cannot even land that menial job.

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“I can’t get a job,” she told the Daily Star. “They won’t have me. I applied for a job cleaning toilets where I live, and they won’t have me because of my tattoos.”

But Sloan’s face etchings are not only causing problems for her when trying to find a job. She has found herself shut out of other aspects of society as well, such as pubs and schools.

One of the first places Sloan found herself banished from was the pub. For British people, the pub is the chief place to meet and socialize in a town or village, but now Sloan has found herself banned from every single pub in her area, all because her tattoos are making patrons and staff uneasy.

“I am banned from pubs in my area. I can’t get in because of my tattoos,” she said.

Should employers look past face tattoos?

Sloan has also found herself banned from her children’s school. She claims that last Christmas, she was made to stand outside the school and watch her child’s nativity play through the window, as other attendees could not bear to sit in the same place as her because of the tattoos.

“They said once for me to go to the back garden [and] look through the class window,” she claimed.

Even tattoo parlors are refusing to serve her, with people claiming that her face is “beyond help” and that they do not want to be involved with her. “Tattoo shops shut the door on me — tattooists won’t let me in.”

Despite the backlash and ostracization she has received, Sloan has no plans to change her lifestyle. She has denied an offer from the National Health Service to use laser treatment to remove the tattoos, and she claims she’ll “never stop” getting more tattoos.

Obviously, Sloan is an adult, and she is free to choose to cover her face in tattoos. The only person she is hurting in that instance is herself.

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At the same time, however, people have a right to react to her and reject her if they find her lifestyle choice objectionable. In the case of finding work, a potential employer is going to have a hard time looking past the facial tattoos when it comes to hiring a candidate for a client-facing position.

People are naturally going to feel uncomfortable in the presence of someone who has decided to cover her entire face in strange ink drawings. It is not normal for someone to do that to themselves.

In any case, Melissa Sloan has chosen to live like this, and now she must face the consequences.

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Peter Partoll is a commentary writer for the Western Journal and a Research Assistant for the Catholic Herald. He earned his bachelor's degree at Hillsdale College and recently finished up his masters degree at Royal Holloway University of London. You can follow him on Twitter at @p_partoll.




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