Share
News

Acquitted Again: Trump Survives Another Impeachment

Share

The Senate has acquitted former President Donald Trump of inciting the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol.

House Democrats, who voted a month ago to charge Trump with “incitement of insurrection,” needed two-thirds of the Senate, or 67 votes, to convict him.

If Trump had been convicted, the Senate would have taken a second vote on whether to ban him from running for office again.

Only two other presidents, Bill Clinton in 1999 and Andrew Johnson in 1868, have been impeached. Both were also acquitted.

Seven Republicans voted to convict Trump, making it the most bipartisan vote in the history of presidential impeachments.

Trending:
Watch: Tucker Carlson Says Election '100% Stolen' from Trump, Breaks Down How it Happened

Voting to find Trump guilty were GOP Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Patrick Toomey of Pennsylvania.

Romney’s “guilty” vote at Trump’s first impeachment trial last February had made him the first senator to ever vote to convict a president of the same party.

Trump welcomed his second acquittal and said his movement “has only just begun.”

In a statement, he thanked his attorneys and his defenders in the House and Senate, who he said “stood proudly for the Constitution we all revere and for the sacred legal principles at the heart of our country.”

He slammed the trial as “yet another phase of the greatest witch hunt in the history of our Country.”

And he told his supporters that “our historic, patriotic and beautiful movement to Make America Great Again has only just begun” and that he will have more to share with them in the months ahead.


[jwplayer KlbhkGTT]

The Western Journal has reviewed this Associated Press story and may have altered it prior to publication to ensure that it meets our editorial standards.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
, , , , ,
Share
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands. Photo credit: @AP on Twitter
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation