Australia captain Lleyton Hewitt slams Davis Cup changes

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ADELAIDE, Australia (AP) — Australia captain Lleyton Hewitt is not happy about the new format beginning this year for the Davis Cup.

Hewitt called the new setup “ridiculous” on Tuesday and ripped into former Barcelona soccer star Gerard Pique, whose Kosmos investment group has been involved with the revamp.

Hewitt says “now we’re getting run by a Spanish football player, which is like me come out and asking to change things for the Champions League. He knows nothing about tennis.”

Australia faces Bosnia-Herzegovina beginning Friday with the winner moving to the 18-team final in November in Madrid.

The move was made to streamline the competition in a congested tennis schedule.

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Hewitt adds: “I don’t agree at all with it. I think having the finals in one place is ridiculous. I personally don’t think all the top players will play. We will wait and see.”

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