Banks won't take sides in Trump subpoena fight

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NEW YORK (AP) — Two banks that have done business with Donald Trump say they aren’t taking sides in a fight between the president and House Democrats over access to his financial records.

Lawyers for Deutsche Bank and Capital One filed letters in court Tuesday stating that they won’t take a position in Trump’s lawsuit seeking to block them from responding to Congressional subpoenas.

Deutsche Bank’s lawyer said the dispute is between Trump and Congress — not the banks.

A hearing is scheduled for May 22.

Lawyers for House Democrats have agreed to let the banks delay their response to the subpoenas until after there’s a ruling.

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Trump wants the banks barred from responding to subpoenas from two House committees that have demanded records as part of investigations into the Republican’s private business dealings.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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