BlocBoy JB sues video game 'Fortnite' over 'Shoot' dance

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LOS ANGELES (AP) — Rapper BlocBoy JB has become the latest to sue “Fortnite,” saying the popular video game is using his “Shoot” dance without permission or compensation.

The Memphis, Tennessee-based rapper, real name James Baker, filed a lawsuit against “Fortnite” maker Epic Games in federal court Wednesday.

Baker says the “Fortnite” ”Hype” dance, one of many “emotes” players can purchase for characters, is identical to his dance.

Baker tells The Associated Press he first thought it was cool his moves were in a video game, but eventually felt like the company was appropriating his property. He says that after asking fans on social media, decided to sue.

Baker joins rapper 2 Milly, actor Alfonso Ribeiro and others who have sued over “Fortnite” dance moves.

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An email seeking comment from an Epic Games attorney was not immediately returned.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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