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Cherokee Nation: Elizabeth Warren apologized for DNA test

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WASHINGTON (AP) — The Cherokee Nation says Sen. Elizabeth Warren has apologized for taking a DNA test to push back against President Donald Trump’s taunts about her claim of Native American heritage.

Tribe spokeswoman Julie Hubbard said Friday that the Massachusetts Democrat and likely 2020 presidential contender had apologized “for causing confusion on tribal sovereignty and tribal citizenship and the harm that has resulted.”

Warren released her DNA test results in October as evidence she had Native American in her bloodline, albeit at least six generations back. She had previously said her Native American roots were part of “family lore.”

The Cherokee Nation complained then that tribal nations, not DNA tests, determine citizenship and that Warren was “undermining tribal interests with her continued claims of tribal heritage.”

Warren’s campaign declined to comment Friday.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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