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Coin toss settles rare Philippine election tie

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MANILA, Philippines (AP) — Philippine election officials settled a rare tie in a mayoral race on Friday by tossing a coin.

They proclaimed Sue Cudilla the new mayor of the town of Araceli in western Palawan province after she won a best-of-three coin flip by picking tails.

Both Cudilla, a former mayor, and her rival, incumbent Noel Beronio, received 3,495 votes in Monday’s election. They agreed to the classic tie-breaker, which officials said is acceptable although local rules specify the drawing of lots.

Elections Commissioner Luie Tito Guia said a coin toss was also used to settle another freak mayoral tie in 2016.

“I’m praying very hard that the will expressed by the people will always be accepted,” Guia said by telephone.

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More than 43,500 candidates vied for about 18,000 congressional and local posts, including 81 governors, 1,634 mayors and more than 13,500 city and town councilors in 81 provinces in the May 13 elections in the Philippines, one of Asia’s most rambunctious democracies.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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