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Man in Police Custody After Cellphone Records Neighbor's Death

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A Colorado man was in custody after the killing of his neighbor was recorded on the victim’s cellphone, police said.

James W. Hanlon, 53, turned himself in to police in the Denver area Friday night.

Colorado Springs police Lt. Howard Black said no other details were being released because the investigation was ongoing.

Police had been looking for Hanlon since Wednesday when 63-year-old Gary Dolce was shot to death in Colorado Springs.

A phone found next to Dolce’s body contained a recording of the shooting.

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An arrest affidavit says the video shows a blue SUV with a driver who is wearing a disposable glove and pointing a black handgun at Dolce.

Several shots are fired, and Dolce is seen falling to the ground yelling “Oh my God!” before more shots are heard.

The shooting occurred about an hour after Hanlon was cited by authorities for having an aggressive animal.

In an audio recording regarding that incident, an animal control officer and Hanlon can be heard talking about a fence separating his property from Dolce’s, the affidavit states.

It also says police responded to an altercation between Dolce and Hanlon more than a month before the shooting.

Dolce told police “his neighbor was trying to get him to fight and that there were ongoing issues with the neighbor,” the document said.

The Western Journal has reviewed this Associated Press story and may have altered it prior to publication to ensure that it meets our editorial standards.

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