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Court OKs dismantling accessibility system on Venice bridge

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ROME (AP) — An Italian court has authorized the city of Venice to remove tracks and cars that were added to a Grand Canal bridge to make it more accessible for people with disabilities but hardly been used due to system flaws.

The mobility system was added to the Ponte della Constituzione (Constitution Bridge) at a cost of about 2 million euros (about $2.3 million) and hasn’t worked well since it started running in 2013.

Visitors complained it was slow and the cars were unbearably hot during the summer.

A glitch trapped two Americans inside a car in May 2015.

The Court of Audit cited ongoing infrastructure costs in its decision sanctioning the system’s removal. It notified Venice Mayor Luigi Brugnaro on Saturday.

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Designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava, the bridge links Piazzale Roma to the Santa Lucia rail station.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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