Parler Share

Don Cheadle sports political shirts as he hosts 'SNL'

Parler Share

NEW YORK (AP) — Don Cheadle delivered some political messages along with jokes as he hosted “Saturday Night Live” for the first time.

The actor sported a T-shirt that said “Protect Trans Kids” as he introduced musical guest Gary Clark Jr.

And in closing Saturday’s show, Cheadle wore a jersey with the former Soviet Union’s initials on the front, while the back bore the name “Trump” and the number 45 — as in the 45th U.S. president, Donald Trump.

Trump tweeted Sunday there’s “nothing funny” about “SNL.” Saturday’s show also featured Alec Baldwin reprising his role as Trump.

The Republican president called the show “tired” and criticized TV networks for what he called “total Republican hit jobs.”

Trending:
Republican Congressional Candidate Flips the Script on Debate Moderator When Asked 'Is Joe Biden President?'

Cheadle earned an Academy Award nomination for 2004’s “Hotel Rwanda.” His other films include “Traffic,” ”Crash” and some “Avengers” movies.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
Parler Share
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands. Photo credit: @AP on Twitter
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation