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Federal Judge Blocks Seattle Law Banning Police Use of Pepper Spray

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A federal judge late Friday blocked Seattle’s new law prohibiting police from using pepper spray, blast balls and similar weapons that was passed following confrontations with protesters.

The Seattle Times reports that U.S. District Judge James Robart at an emergency hearing granted a request from the federal government to block the new law, which the Seattle City Council passed unanimously last month.

The Department of Justice, citing Seattle’s longstanding police consent decree, argued that banning the use of crowd control weapons could actually lead to the use of more police force, leaving them only with more deadly weapons.

Robart said the issue needed more discussion between the city and the Justice Department before the change went into effect.

Ruling from the bench just before 9 p.m., Robart said the restraining order he granted would be “very temporary.”

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“I urge you all to use it as an occasion to try to find out where it is we are and where it is we’re going,” Robart said.

“I can’t tell you today if blast balls are a good idea or a bad idea, but I know that sometime a long time ago I approved them.”

Robart is presiding over a 2012 consent decree requiring the city to address allegations of excessive force and biased policing.


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