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Felicity Huffman to plead guilty in admissions scam May 13

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BOSTON (AP) — Felicity Huffman is expected to plead guilty May 13 to charges that she took part in a sweeping college admissions cheating scam.

The “Desperate Housewives” star had been scheduled to enter her plea in Boston federal court on May 21. But a judge agreed Monday to move up the hearing because the lead prosecutor will be out of town.

Also Monday, lawyers formally entered not guilty pleas in court on behalf of “Full House” actress Lori Loughlin (LAWK’-lin); her husband, Mossimo Giannulli; and more than a dozen other parents.

They had previously pleaded not guilty in court documents. The judge allowed the parents to skip their arraignment.

Huffman was accused of paying $15,000 to rig her daughter’s SAT score.

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Loughlin and Giannulli are charged with paying $500,000 in bribes to get their daughters into the University of Southern California.

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