'Fresh Prince' star sues maker of video games over his dance

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LOS ANGELES (AP) — “The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air” star Alfonso Ribeiro is suing the creators of Fortnite and NBA 2K for using his famous dance on the popular video games.

In separate lawsuits filed Monday in federal court, Ribeiro alleges that Fortnite-maker Epic Games and 2K Sports-creator Take-Two Interactive used his dance dubbed “The Carlton Dance” without permission or credit.

Ribeiro’s dance was popularized through his character, Carlton Banks, on the 1990s sitcom.

Ribeiro says North Carolina-based Epic Games and Delaware-based Take Two used his dance he first performed on a 1991 “Fresh Prince” episode. He’s asking for a judge’s order to stop both games from using his moves.

Ribeiro says he is currently in the middle of copyrighting the dance.

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Epic Games and Take Two spokesmen didn’t respond to requests for comment.

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