Share

Gillibrand's Family Bill of Rights would cut parents' costs

Share

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Kirsten Gillibrand (KEER’-sten JIHL’-uh-brand) says she wants to improve women’s access to maternal care and make adoptions and high-tech fertility treatments more accessible to those who want children.

The New York senator said Wednesday she’s proposing a Family Bill of Rights that would improve access to obstetrician-gynecologists while making adoptions or in vitro fertilization accessible for everyone wanting children, regardless of income, religion or sexual orientation.

The plan also would provide baby bundles for new parents, with items like diapers, onesies and a small mattress. It also includes paid family leave, universal prekindergarten programs and expanded child care tax credits.

Gillibrand proposes paying for the measures with a 0.1% tax on financial transactions like stock purchases, which she says would generate $777 billion over 10 years.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



loading

We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
Share
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




loading

Conversation