Girls outscore boys on tech, engineering, even without class

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SEATTLE (AP) — Though less likely to study in a formal technology or engineering course, America’s girls are showing more mastery of those subjects than their boy classmates, according to newly released national education data.

Known as “The Nation’s Report Card,” the latest findings made public Tuesday from the National Assessment of Educational Progress also shows U.S. eighth-graders in 2018 did significantly better overall.

The report suggests the decade-long effort to champion more opportunities for girls and women in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math is gaining ground.

The report shows girls are outperforming boys in technology and engineering literacy, even though 61% of male students reported taking at least one technology or engineering class, such as coding or robotics, while only 53% of female students reported doing the same.

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Sally Ho covers philanthropy and education. Follow her on Twitter: https://twitter.com/_SallyHo

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