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Iconic Hollywood Sign Gets Major Makeover

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The Hollywood sign is getting a makeover befitting its status as a Tinseltown icon.

After a pressure-wash and some rust removal, workers began using 250 gallons of primer and white paint to spruce up the sign ahead of its centennial next year.

The entire renovation effort is expected to take up to eight weeks.

Originally built in 1923, the sign read “Hollywoodland” to promote a property development.

But after decades of neglect, the original sign was shortened to read “Hollywood.” It was replaced altogether with a new sign in 1978.

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“It’s now representing not only the place of Hollywood, but it signifies the entertainment industry, and L.A. is the entertainment capital of the world,” Jeff Zarrinnam with the Hollywood Sign Trust said Monday.

The 45-foot-tall sign in the Hollywood Hills above Los Angeles is repainted every decade.

The Western Journal has reviewed this Associated Press story and may have altered it prior to publication to ensure that it meets our editorial standards.

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