Share

Israel: 'Much safer' Mediterranean with Cyprus teamwork

Share

NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) — Israel’s president on Tuesday hailed his country’s flourishing ties with Cyprus, saying that cooperation between the two neighbors on intelligence, security and terror prevention has made the eastern Mediterranean “much, much safer.”

“Security ties between our two countries have never been better,” Israeli President Reuven Rivlin said after talks with Cypriot counterpart Nicos Anastasiades during a visit to the island nation.

“Our navies and commando units share space, knowledge and experience,” he added, without elaborating.

Rivlin said the prime focus of the strategic partnership that includes Greece is developing the East Med gas pipeline that “could be one of the greatest underwater projects in the world.”

The envisioned pipeline would carry natural gas from deposits in the eastern Mediterranean to Europe via Greece and Italy.

Trending:
Olympic Athlete Reveals Chilling Side Effect of COVID Booster Shot

Anastasiades said Cyprus and Israel share a joint commitment to the East Med project that would diversify Europe’s hydrocarbons supply and bolster its energy security.

“Our synergies are beacons of hope,” Anastasiades said.

Israeli-Cypriot relations have blossomed in the last decade following gas discoveries in waters off both countries. Israeli company Delek has a stake in Cyprus’ Aphrodite gas field, which lies close to Israel’s massive Leviathan deposit.

Currently, energy companies including Italy’s Eni, France’s Total and ExxonMobil are involved in a hydrocarbons search in the waters of Cyprus’ southern coastline.

Turkey, however, insists the exploration infringes on its rights and the rights of breakaway Turkish Cypriots to east Mediterranean hydrocarbon reserves. Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu said last month that Turkey planned to send a ship to search for gas around Cyprus.

Rivlin said energy cooperation in the eastern Mediterranean could also benefit Egypt, Jordan and the Palestinians. He said he discussed with Anastasiades the possibility of expanding the Israel-Cyprus-Greece partnership to include other countries.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

Truth and Accuracy

Submit a Correction →



We are committed to truth and accuracy in all of our journalism. Read our editorial standards.

Tags:
Share
The Associated Press is an independent, not-for-profit news cooperative headquartered in New York City. Their teams in over 100 countries tell the world’s stories, from breaking news to investigative reporting. They provide content and services to help engage audiences worldwide, working with companies of all types, from broadcasters to brands.
The Associated Press was the first private sector organization in the U.S. to operate on a national scale. Over the past 170 years, they have been first to inform the world of many of history's most important moments, from the assassination of Abraham Lincoln and the bombing of Pearl Harbor to the fall of the Shah of Iran and the death of Pope John Paul.

Today, they operate in 263 locations in more than 100 countries relaying breaking news, covering war and conflict and producing enterprise reports that tell the world's stories.
Location
New York City




Conversation

The Western Journal is pleased to bring back comments to our articles! Due to threatened de-monetization by Big Tech, we had temporarily removed comments, but we have now implemented a solution to bring back the conversation that Big Tech doesn't want you to have. If you have any problems using the new commenting platform, please contact customer support at commenting-help@insticator.com. Welcome back!