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Joke Toilet Display Mocking Mail-In Voting Deemed a Crime by Dem Official

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A Michigan resident’s joke mocking mail-in voting is no laughing matter for one local elections official.

The resident put a toilet on his or her lawn with a sign saying, “Place mail in ballots here!”

Barb Byrum, the Democratic clerk of Ingham County, filed a complaint with police over the display, saying it could mislead voters.

“It is a felony to take illegal possession of an absentee ballot,” Byrum said Friday.

“Elections in this country are to be taken seriously and there are many people who are voting by mail for the first time this election,” she said.

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Byrum didn’t identify the person who lives at the address. The lawn also has a sign that calls for the recall of Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer.

No one answered the door on Friday night, the Lansing State Journal reported.

More than 2 million Michigan voters can cast absentee ballots after changes in election law.

Separately, a judge on Friday said absentee ballots postmarked by Nov. 2 can be counted if received within 14 days after the Nov. 3 election.

 

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