Microsoft overhauls how it investigates office misbehavior

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REDMOND, Wash. (AP) — Microsoft is revamping its practices for investigating workplace allegations after a group of women shared stories of discrimination and sexual harassment.

CEO Satya Nadella sent a letter to employees about the changes Monday.

Nadella says the company is increasing support services for workers who say they’ve experienced misbehavior, including a new “Employee Advocacy Team” to help guide employees through investigations.

He says Microsoft will also require inclusivity training for all its roughly 16,000 managers, set new and more consistent disciplinary guidelines and create more transparency about the outcome of investigations.

The changes follow a large internal email chain started last month by employees sharing personal stories of experiencing misconduct. That caught the attention of top executives.

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Nadella’s letter to employees was first reported by news site Quartz.

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