Montana governor OKs bills investing $400M in infrastructure

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HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Montana Gov. Steve Bullock signed a series of bills Friday that allow for spending nearly $400 million on buildings, bridges and water systems across the state — an effort aimed at creating jobs, boosting the state’s economy and clearing up a backlog of needed work.

The bills include money to repair or replace 14 bridges and 51 water, wastewater and sewer projects. Overall, the 2019 Legislature passed $2.7 billion in infrastructure projects, including highway projects.

One of the measures was the result of a bipartisan effort to set guidelines to determine how much money the state can afford to borrow and spend on building construction and maintenance, based on state revenues and existing debt.

Those guidelines helped clear the way for legislation to sell about $80 million in bonds for infrastructure projects including $25 million for long-sought renovations to Romney Hall at Montana State University. It also funds a dental hygiene lab at Great Falls College and pays for backlogged maintenance at state buildings, including $2 million for the state Capitol complex.

After the 2019 Legislature adjourned, both Democrats and Republicans touted the economic benefit of the bonding bill and other infrastructure measures.

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Bullock, a Democrat, also signed a bill Friday to increase the state lodging tax by 1 percentage point to raise $34 million for a new Montana Historical Society museum along with grant money for other museums across the state. The increase takes effect on Jan. 1, 2020.

“These long-term investments in every corner of Montana will have a lasting impact that allow urban and rural communities to sustain strong economic growth,” Bullock said in a statement.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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