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Newspaper drops 'Non Sequitur' cartoon over Trump insult

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BUTLER, Pa. (AP) — At least one newspaper says it has dropped the syndicated cartoon “Non Sequitur” after a vulgar message to President Donald Trump appeared in it.

The Butler Eagle in Pennsylvania reported Sunday that the “shot at President Donald Trump” will cost cartoonist Wiley Miller “his place in the Eagle’s Sunday comics.”

A scribbled message in one panel of that day’s cartoon appears to begin with “We fondly say go …” followed by the message to Trump.

It’s not clear whether other publications have dropped the strip, distributed by Andrews McMeel Syndication. The company’s website says “Non Sequitur” appears in more than 700 newspapers.

Miller appeared to acknowledge the message in a tweet that said “some of my sharp-eyed readers have spotted a little Easter egg. … Can you find it?”

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Emails seeking comment were left with the syndicate and with Miller.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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