No plan for Smollett to do follow-up police interview Monday

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CHICAGO (AP) — Attorneys for “Empire” actor Jussie Smollett say there are no plans for him to meet with Chicago detectives Monday for a follow-up interview about his reported assault.

Anne Kavanagh is a spokeswoman for Smollett’s lawyers. She says in an emailed statement that his lawyers “will keep an active dialogue with Chicago police on his behalf.”

Smollett reported last month that he was physically attacked by two men who yelled homophobic and racial slurs. He said they also yelled he was in “MAGA Country,” an apparent reference to President Donald Trump’s campaign slogan.

Police said Saturday that the investigation had “shifted” after detectives questioned two brothers about the attack and released them without charges. Police say they’ve requested a follow-up interview with Smollett.

Smollett’s lawyers say the actor feels “victimized” by reports that he played a role in the assault.

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Check out the AP’s complete coverage of the Jussie Smollett case.

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