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Peter Frampton's doctors hope to highlight rare disease

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BALTIMORE (AP) — Doctors at Johns Hopkins University hope to raise awareness and funds for research following famed guitarist Peter Frampton’s announcement that he has a rare muscular disease.

Frampton’s physician, Lisa Christopher-Stine, is the director of the Johns Hopkins Myositis Center. She tells The Baltimore Sun that she and Frampton spoke years ago about potentially becoming a voice for inclusion body myositis. Because the disease is rare, it’s difficult to generate funding.

The disease causes weakness in the legs, forearms and fingers. Its cause is still unknown. As it will eventually prevent Frampton from playing guitar, the 68-year-old is embarking on a farewell tour this summer.

He’s also launched a fund at Hopkins to which he’ll donate $1 per ticket sold.

Hopkins is also participating in two clinical trials for possible treatments.

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Information from: The Baltimore Sun, http://www.baltimoresun.com

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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