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Police Chief Punished After Charging High-Ranking Dem in Destruction of Confederate Statue

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The police chief in Portsmouth, Virginia, is on paid leave nearly three weeks after her department charged a state senator and several others with conspiring to damage a Confederate monument.

City spokeswoman Dana Woodson confirmed in an email on Friday that Chief Angela Greene is on leave and that an assistant police chief will assume her duties in the meantime.

The city declined to comment further. No one answered the telephone Friday at a number listed for Greene.

Allies of state Sen. Louise Lucas in Richmond have called the felony charges against her legally weak and political.

The case is based on comments that police say Lucas made in the hours before protesters ripped heads off Confederate statues and pulled one down, critically injuring a demonstrator.

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The charges were filed without the cooperation of the local prosecutor’s office.

Lucas and several others face counts of conspiracy to commit a felony and injury to a monument in excess of $1,000. Others who were charged included a school board member as well as members of the local NAACP chapter and public defender’s office.

Greene became Portsmouth’s police chief in 2019.

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