Populists expected to gain seats in May's EU elections

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BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Parliament is predicting that nationalist, populist and anti-migrant groups will make significant gains in the May 23-26 EU elections but says it thinks mainstream parties will keep control over the assembly.

Projections released Thursday suggest the center-right European People’s Party will remain the biggest group, with 180 seats in the 751-seat parliament, down 37 seats. The center-left Socialists and Democrats would drop from 186 to 149 seats.

The Europe of Nations and Freedom group, which combines right-wing and far-right parties like Italy’s Liga, Britain’s UKIP and France’s National Rally would win 62 seats, compared to 37 currently.

New parties like former UKIP figurehead Nigel Farage’s Brexit Party, which are listed as “other,” are expected to expand from 21 seats to 62.

The data is collected from national surveys and assumes that Britain will participate.

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