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Raiders have talks about returning to Coliseum for 2019

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ALAMEDA, Calif. (AP) — The Raiders have had their first talks about returning for one final season in Oakland since the city filed suit over the team’s planned move to Las Vegas.

Oakland Coliseum executive director Scott McKibben said Tuesday that he met with Raiders president Marc Badain last week about a lease for 2019. McKibben called the meeting “meaningful and productive” but gave no other details.

The two sides had been discussing a $7.5 million lease for 2019 until the Raiders walked away from negotiations when Oakland sued the team and the NFL in December.

The Raiders have no lease for 2019, their final season before moving into a new $1.8 billion, 65,000-seat stadium in Las Vegas. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell has said the team needs to make a decision soon so the league can make a schedule.

The Raiders had talks about sharing a stadium with the San Francisco Giants, but that was opposed by the 49ers. The Raiders also could look into sharing Levi’s Stadium with the 49ers, although owner Mark Davis has been opposed to that option.

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The Raiders didn’t respond to a request for comment.

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More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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