Single winner of Alaska ice-melt guessing game announced

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ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Nenana Ice Classic organizers have announced this year’s winner for the guessing contest.

Ice Classic manager Cherrie Forness says Anchorage resident Patricia Andrew was the only person to guess the exact time the ice officially went out on the Tanana River in Nenana. That happened at 12:21 a.m. April 14, the earliest in the contest’s 102-year history.

The jackpot is $311,652. Forness says Andrew will receive $224,389.44 after federal taxes are withheld. There is no listing for Andrew in Anchorage. She could not be reached for comment.

The payout will be made June 1.

Each year, people buy tickets to guess when a tripod mounted on the frozen Tanana River will fall over as ice on the river breaks up.

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Forness estimates about 287,000 tickets were sold this year.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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