The Latest: China airlines told to ground Boeing 737 Max 8s

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BEIJING (AP) — In a story March 11 about the Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft after a crash in Ethiopia, The Associated Press reported erroneously that China grounded its models of the same plane for nine hours. China’s aviation authority ordered its airlines to ground their Boeing 737 8 Max jets within nine hours, or by 6 p.m.

A corrected version of the story is below:

The Latest: China airlines told to ground Boeing 737 Max 8s

China’s civilian aviation authority has ordered all Chinese airlines to temporarily ground their Boeing 737 Max 8 planes after one of the aircraft crashed in Ethiopia

BEIJING (AP) — The Latest on Boeing’s 737 Max 8 model after a crash in Ethiopia (all times local):

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10:30 a.m.

China’s civilian aviation authority has ordered all Chinese airlines to temporarily ground their Boeing 737 Max 8 planes after one of the aircraft crashed in Ethiopia.

The Civil Aviation Administration of China said the order is to take effect by 6:00 p.m. Monday.

It said the order was taken out of safety concerns because the crash was the second after another of the planes fell into the ocean off the coast of Indonesia in similar circumstances in October, killing all aboard.

It said further notice would be issued after consultation with the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and Boeing on safety measures taken.

Eight Chinese nationals were among the 157 people aboard the plane when it crashed Sunday shortly after takeoff.

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This story has been corrected to say Indonesian crash was in October, not December.

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2 a.m.

Boeing’s newest version of its most popular plane is again in the spotlight after a deadly accident in Ethiopia.

A Boeing 737 Max 8 operated by Ethiopian Airlines crashed shortly after taking off Sunday from Addis Ababa, killing all 157 people on board.

The plane was new. The weather was clear. Yet something was wrong, and the pilots tried to return to the airport. They never made it.

Those circumstances make the accident eerily similar to an October crash in Indonesia that killed all 189 people on the plane.

Safety experts are noticing the similarities but say a verdict on the plane should wait until investigations are complete.

Boeing says its plane is safe. The company’s sales didn’t suffer after the Indonesia crash, and its stock price has soared.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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