The Latest: Cuomo says shutdown puts air travelers at risk

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NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on delays in U.S. air travel (all times local):

11:40 a.m.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says delays at East Coast airports amid a partial federal government shutdown are another symptom of the “federal madness” caused by Republican President Donald Trump.

The Democrat says the delays are hurting the economy and impacting airport safety and security. His comments came at an unrelated event in Manhattan Friday morning.

Earlier in the day Cuomo wrote to Trump demanding an end to the shutdown, saying it could become a national security issue.

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The letter was sent shortly before the FAA announced LaGuardia Airport in New York and Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey were both experiencing delays in takeoffs due to staffing problems at two air traffic control facilities.

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11:05 a.m.

The White House says President Donald Trump has been briefed on airport delays amid the extended partial government shutdown.

White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders says in a statement: “The President has been briefed and we are monitoring the ongoing delays at some airports. We are in regular contact with officials at the Department of Transportation and the FAA.”

The Federal Aviation Administration is reporting delays in air travel because of a “slight increase in sick leave” at two East Coast air traffic control facilities.

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10:55 a.m.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo says the federal government shutdown is impacting safety and security at airports and putting travelers at risk.

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The Democrat wrote to Republican President Donald Trump on Friday demanding that he reopen government immediately. He said the partial shutdown is reducing staffing for Transportation Security Administration workers as well as air traffic controllers. He noted an increase in the number of TSA workers calling in absent, and said many air traffic controllers are working extra shifts without pay.

Cuomo’s letter was announced shortly before the FAA announced LaGuardia Airport in New York and Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey were both experiencing delays in takeoffs due to staffing problems at two East Coast air traffic control facilities.

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10:40 a.m.

The Federal Aviation Administration is reporting delays in air travel because of a “slight increase in sick leave” at two East Coast air traffic control facilities.

FAA spokesman Gregory Martin said Friday that it had augmented staffing, rerouted traffic and increased spacing between planes as needed.

The staffing problems were at air traffic centers in Jacksonville, Florida and a Washington D.C. center that controls high-altitude air traffic over seven states.

Martin says safety is being maintained during a period of “minimal impacts” on travel.

LaGuardia Airport in New York and Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey were both experiencing delays in takeoffs.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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