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The Latest: Denver teachers union says it will launch strike

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DENVER (AP) — The Latest on a possible Denver teachers strike (all times local):

10 p.m.

The superintendent of Denver Public Schools says she’s disappointed that the teachers union broke off negotiations Saturday night.

In a statement, Superintendent Susana Cordova said: “I am extremely disappointed that the DCTA walked away from the table today instead of continuing to talk and work toward reaching an agreement. We presented an updated proposal that responds to what we heard from our teachers, aligns to our values of equity and retention, honors the ProComp ballot language, and significantly increases the base pay for all of our educators. Despite the union’s refusal to continue negotiating, we remain committed to working with the leadership of the DCTA to end this strike.”

Teachers plan to picket schools around the city starting Monday. The district says schools will remain open during the strike and will be staffed by administrators and substitute teachers.

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However, the district has canceled classes for 5,000 pre-schoolers because it doesn’t have the staff to take care of them.

The teachers’ union says 93 percent of participating members backed a strike in a vote last month.

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8:35 p.m.

Denver teachers say they will strike Monday after failing to win an agreement on pay.

Both sides met Saturday in an attempt to reach a new contract after over a year of negotiations.

A statement issued Saturday night by the Denver Classroom Teachers Association says: “Faced with a smoke-and-mirrors proposal that continues to lack transparency and pushes for failed incentives for some over meaningful base salary for all, the DCTA strike will commence for the schools Denver students deserve.”

Teachers plan to picket schools around the city starting Monday. The district says schools will remain open during the strike and will be staffed by administrators and substitute teachers.

However, the district has canceled classes for 5,000 pre-schoolers because it doesn’t have the staff to take care of them.

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The teachers’ union says 93 percent of participating members backed a strike in a vote last month.

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7:10 p.m.

In several statements posted Saturday night on its Twitter account, the Denver teachers union said the Denver Public Schools’ latest contract offer is not good enough.

The bargaining team issued a tweet saying: “We can do better.”

The disagreements are about pay increases and about bonuses for teachers in high-poverty schools and other schools that the district considers a priority.

The teachers want lower bonuses to free up money for better overall salaries. The district says the bonuses are key to boosting the academic performance of poor and minority students.

Some teachers say overall funding for support services in those schools is more important.

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6:45 p.m.

The head of the Denver teachers union says he has “significant concerns” about a new contract proposal from Denver Public Schools.

On Saturday night, Denver Classroom Teachers Association President Henry Roman (ro-MAHN’) said: “It seems to us that they have deliberately constructed a proposal to make it look like they are moving when they are not. “

The disagreements are about pay increases and about bonuses for teachers in high-poverty schools and other schools that the district considers a priority.

The teachers want lower bonuses to free up money for better overall salaries. The district says the bonuses are key to boosting the academic performance of poor and minority students.

Some teachers say overall funding for support services in those schools is more important.

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1:45 p.m.

Denver teachers and school administrators have resumed negotiations in hopes of averting a strike on Monday.

The two sides met Saturday, a few hours after a Friday night session failed to resolve their differences.

Denver Public Schools officials said the Friday session was productive, but Denver Classroom Teachers Association President Henry Roman (ro-MAHN’) said they made little progress.

The disagreements are about pay increases and about bonuses for teachers in high-poverty schools and other schools that the district considers a priority.

The teachers want lower bonuses to free up money for better overall salaries. The district says the bonuses are key to boosting the academic performance of poor and minority students.

Some teachers say overall funding for support services in those schools is more important.

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8:55 a.m.

Talks are continuing this weekend as Denver teachers and school administrators try to avert a strike on Monday.

Denver Public Schools and the Denver Classroom Teachers Association scheduled more negotiations on Saturday after meeting on Friday night.

School district officials said Friday’s talks were productive, but teachers union President Henry Roman (ro-MAHN’) said the two sides made little progress.

They disagree on pay increases and the size of bonuses for teachers working in high-poverty schools and other schools that the district considers a priority.

The teachers want lower bonuses to free up money for better overall salaries. The district says the bonuses are key to boosting the academic performance of poor and minority students.

Some teachers say overall funding for support services in those schools is more important.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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