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The Latest: Judge rules Qualcomm violated antitrust law

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NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on federal judge’s ruling against Qualcomm (all times local):

11:15 a.m.

A federal ruling against Qualcomm is likely to reduce the licensing fees paid on the sales of smartphones.

But it’s unclear if device makers such as Apple will pass on any of their savings and lower their prices. The royalties represent a relatively small portion of smartphone prices that now top $1,000 for some premium models.

U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh in San Jose, California, is siding with the Federal Trade Commission in its antitrust case against Qualcomm. She says Qualcomm unlawfully squeezed out rivals in the cellphone chip market and charged excessive royalties.

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Qualcomm says it will appeal.

The chipmaker’s stock is down 11% in morning trading.

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10:40 a.m.

A federal judge has ruled that Qualcomm unlawfully squeezed out rivals in the cellphone chip market and charged excessive royalties.

U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh in San Jose, California, is siding with the Federal Trade Commission in the antitrust case.

She ruled Tuesday that Qualcomm must renegotiate licensing deals with customers. The San Diego company must license its patents to rival chip makers at fair prices and can’t sign exclusive supply agreements with smartphone makers like Apple that block competitors from access to that market.

Qualcomm Inc. must submit to monitoring for the next seven years to make sure it follows the order.

Qualcomm says it will appeal.

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The chipmaker’s stock is down 11% in morning trading.

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8:25 a.m.

Qualcomm’s stock is tumbling before the opening bell after a federal judge ruled that the company unlawfully stifled cellphone chip market competition and charged excessive licensing fees.

U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh in San Jose, California found Tuesday that Qualcomm violated antitrust law, charging high royalties and squeezing out rivals, according to Wall Street Journal report.

Koh ordered Qualcomm to negotiate or renegotiate licensing deals with customers. The company must also license its patents to rival chip makers at fair prices and can’t sign exclusive supply agreements with smartphone makers like Apple that block competitors from access to that market.

Qualcomm Inc. must submit to monitoring for the next seven years to make sure it follows the order.

Shares are down 12% in premarket trading Wednesday.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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