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The Latest: Jury begins deliberating in El Chapo drug trial

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NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on the U.S. trial of the Mexican drug lord known as El Chapo (all times local):

4:40 p.m.

The jury at the U.S. trial of the Mexican drug lord known as El Chapo has ended its first day of deliberations without a verdict.

Jurors are deciding the fate of Joaquin Guzman in his drug-trafficking case. They are set to resume deliberating on Tuesday morning.

The jury has heard testimony lasting nearly three months about Guzman’s rise to power as the head of the Sinaloa cartel. Prosecutors say he is responsible for smuggling at least 200 tons of cocaine into the United States and using violence to protect his turf.

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The defense claims his role has been exaggerated by cooperators who are seeking leniency in their own cases.

Guzman faces a life sentence if convicted.

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1:40 p.m.

The jury at the U.S. trial of the Mexican drug lord known as El Chapo has begun deliberations.

Jurors began deciding the federal drug-trafficking case against Joaquin Guzman on Monday afternoon.

The jury has heard testimony lasting nearly three months about Guzman’s rise to power as the head of the Sinaloa cartel. Prosecutors say he is responsible for smuggling at least 200 tons of cocaine into the United States and using violence to protect his turf.

The defense claims his role has been exaggerated by cooperators who are seeking leniency in their own cases.

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker paid a visit to the courtroom on Monday to thank the trial team.

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10:45 a.m.

A judge has been giving instructions to jurors at the U.S. drug-trafficking trial of the Mexican drug lord known as El Chapo.

They will begin deciding the fate of Joaquin Guzman on Monday.

The jury has heard testimony lasting nearly three months about Guzman’s rise to power as the head of the Sinaloa cartel. Prosecutors say he is responsible for smuggling at least 200 tons of cocaine into the United States and using violence to protect his turf.

The defense claims his role has been exaggerated by cooperators who are seeking leniency in their own cases.

The 61-year-old Guzman has been in solitary confinement since being sent to the U.S. in 2017. He faces life in prison if convicted.

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7:20 a.m.

A jury is set to begin deliberations at the U.S. drug-trafficking trial of the Mexican drug lord known as El Chapo.

The judge is expected to give instructions to jurors Monday morning before asking them to decide the fate of Joaquin Guzman.

The jury has heard testimony lasting nearly three months about Guzman’s rise to power as the head of the Sinaloa cartel. Prosecutors say he’s responsible for smuggling at least 200 tons of cocaine into the United States and using violence to protect his turf.

The defense claims his role has been exaggerated by cooperators who are seeking leniency in their own cases.

The 61-year-old Guzman has been in solitary confinement since being sent to the U.S. in 2017. He faces life in prison if convicted.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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