The Latest: San Francisco bans cash-snubbing stores

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SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The Latest on a San Francisco vote on making retailers take cash (all times local):

2:30 p.m.

San Francisco supervisors unanimously approved legislation requiring retailers to accept cash for payment.

San Francisco on Tuesday followed Philadelphia and New Jersey in banning cashless stores, saying they discriminate against low-income consumers who may not have access to credit cards.

Backlash against retailers who only accept payment by credit card, debit card or smartphone is growing nationally, as is recognition by cashless stores that the policy shuts out customers.

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Some cashless retailers have said it’s safer and more efficient not to handle cash.

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11 a.m.

Amazon Go has opened its first cash-taking convenience store in New York as San Francisco officials prepare to vote on banning cashless stores.

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors is likely to approve a measure Tuesday requiring brick-and-mortar retailers to take cash as payment.

Critics of places that refuse to take cash say the practice discriminates against low-income people who may not have access to credit cards. Elected officials are passing bans after the rollout last year of cashless Amazon Go stores that require a smartphone app to enter and buy goods.

The new store in New York City is in a high-end shopping mall frequented by office workers.

Employees will let in customers who want to pay with cash and scan items with a mobile device. They’ll make change.

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12 a.m.

San Francisco is about to require brick-and-mortar retailers to take cash as payment.

If approved by the Board of Supervisors at a meeting Tuesday, San Francisco would join Philadelphia and New Jersey in banning a growing paperless practice that critics say discriminates against low-income people who may not have access to credit cards.

Cashless retailers say it’s safer and more efficient not to handle cash.

In many ways, the legislation is an easy call for San Francisco officials, who are striving to make life more equitable in a city with an enormous wealth gap.

Elected officials are passing bans after the rollout last year of cashless Amazon Go stores. The company has since agreed to accept cash at its stores, though it hasn’t said when that will happen.

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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