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The Latest: Trump promises a 'productive' day of talks

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WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump’s meeting with South Korean President Moon Jae-in (all times local):

12:55 p.m.

President Donald Trump says the U.S. wants to see sanctions against North Korea continue for now.

In an Oval Office meeting with the leader of South Korea on Thursday, Trump said he thinks that sanctions being used to pressure Kim Jong Un (gihm jung oon) to give up his nuclear weapons program are at a level that’s “fair.”

It is South Korean President Moon Jae-in’s first meeting with Trump since Trump’s unsuccessful summit with Kim in Vietnam in February.

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Moon has been acting as a go-between to resolve the nuclear standoff. Moon has worked aggressively to foster better relations between the North and South and doesn’t want to see nuclear talks derailed.

Trump says the U.S. wants sanctions to “remain in place.”

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12:45 p.m.

The leader of South Korea says that since President Donald Trump met Kim Jong Un (gihm jung oon) in Vietnam, there has been a marked reduction in “military tension” with North Korea.

South Korean President Moon Jae-in is meeting with Trump at the White House for the first time since the unsuccessful summit between Trump and Kim in Hanoi. Moon said Thursday that South Korea believes that Trump will be able to solve the nuclear standoff through dialogue.

Moon says the important task now is to “maintain the momentum of dialogue” and hold a third summit in the future.

Trump says a third summit could happen but that’s it’s “step by step.” He wouldn’t say whether he had talked to Kim since the Hanoi meeting in late February.

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12:40 p.m.

President Donald Trump says he’s going to talk with the president of South Korea about prospects for future meetings to negotiate an end to the nuclear standoff with North Korea.

Efforts to get North Korean leader Kim Jong Un (gihm jung oon) to give up his nuclear weapons tops the agenda of Trump’s meeting in the Oval Office on Thursday with South Korean President Moon Jae-in. Trump says that it’s going to be a “productive” day of talks and that over time “tremendous things will happen” with North Korea.

Trump also says that he continues to have good relations with Kim and that they had a good meeting in Vietnam although they didn’t accomplish what they wanted.

A third summit between Trump and Kim has not been announced.

The South Korean leader has been shuttling between Washington and Pyongyang (pyuhng-yahng) to keep the nuclear talks on track.

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12:15 p.m.

President Donald Trump is meeting with the leader of South Korea to discuss a way forward for nuclear talks with North Korea.

It is President Moon Jae-in’s first meeting with Trump since an unsuccessful nuclear summit with Kim Jong Un (gihm jung oon) in February in Hanoi. And it comes amid uncertainty over whether Kim is considering backing out of negotiations or restarting nuclear and missile tests.

The South Korean leader has been shuttling between Washington and Pyongyang (pyuhng-yahng) to keep the nuclear talks on track.

The Korean Central News Agency said Thursday that at a party meeting on Wednesday, Kim stressed “self-reliance” in his country to “deal a telling blow to the hostile forces” that “go with bloodshot eyes miscalculating that sanctions can bring” North Korea “to its knees.”

The Western Journal has not reviewed this Associated Press story prior to publication. Therefore, it may contain editorial bias or may in some other way not meet our normal editorial standards. It is provided to our readers as a service from The Western Journal.

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